Wear Red Day for heart disease awareness

Maury Regional Health invites the public to join its efforts to raise awareness of heart disease among women by participating in National Wear Red Day on Friday, February 1. The event is part of the Go Red for Women movement sponsored by the American Heart Association.

“While heart disease affects millions of people, statistics show us that a large percentage of heart disease may be preventable, in part through increased education and lifestyle changes,” said Administrative Director of Cardiovascular Services Cathy Malone. “Maury Regional Health participates in the Go Red movement to encourage community members to become more informed about their personal risk for heart disease and to learn ways to improve their heart health.”

According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the leading cause of death for women, claiming the life of approximately one woman every minute. In addition:

Heart disease affects women of all ages.

Sixty-four percent of women who die suddenly of heart disease had no prior symptoms.

Symptoms of heart disease can vary widely between men and women.

Warning signs of a heart attack may include pressure or pain in the chest, shortness of breath, fatigue, lightheadedness, nausea and discomfort in other areas such as an arm, the back or jaw.

Anyone who thinks they might be experiencing heart problems should call 9-1-1 immediately. Emergency responders are equipped to begin treatment right away and to relay vital information while in route to the Emergency Department where physicians and medical staff can begin treatment immediately upon arrival

Maury Regional Medical Center (MRMC) has been designated by the American College of Cardiology as an accredited chest pain center. Treatments for heart attack may include intervention to open blocked vessels. Interventional procedures are performed in the MRMC cardiac catheterization laboratory in partnership with Vanderbilt Heart-Columbia, which is comprised of both cardiologists and interventional cardiologists.

Comments are closed.